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086 St. George [ Bush ] and the Dragon [ Terrorist ]

Mortification was manifested through the symbolism of St. George and the Dragon.

Slaying the Dragon

In that day, the Lord will punish Leviathan the fleeing serpent,
With His fierce and great and mighty sword,
Even Leviathan the twisted serpent;
And He will kill the dragon who lives in the sea.
— Isaiah 27:1

I hold my harpoon! I grasp my spear-shaft! Heir of the Lord of Mesen am I! I embark on my boat near the Lake of Horus and I drive back the steps of all “Those who are in the water.” […] the “hidden ones,” I cut to pieces “Burning Mouths.”

And behold, the enemies of Re having transformed themselves into crocodiles and hippopotamuses hurled themselves into the water. And while Re-Harakhti was seated [in his boat] and sailing over the water, the crocodiles and the hippopotamuses came nigh, and opened wide their jaws in order to destroy their enemy Re-Harakhti. Then Horus Behedety made haste and came up, with his followers behind him, armed with metal weapons, each one by name having an axe, a spear, and a chain in hand. They speared the crocodiles and the hippopotamuses, and there were brought in forthwith six-hundred and fifty-one rebel-fiends, and they were slain opposite to the city of Edfu.

The Greeks gave the name of their own god Typhon to the Egyptian Seth. Hesiod wrote:

Typhoeus, mighty god, whose hands were strong
And feet untiring. On his shoulders grew
A hundred snaky heads, strange dragon heads
With black tongues darting out. His eyes flashed fire
Beneath the brows upon those heads, and fire
Blazed out from every head when he looked round. [Theogony, 820 ff.]

The dragon tale is found throughout the world, often in the form of a folktale. Frazer wrote:

The story varies in detail from people to people, but as commonly told runs thus. A certain country is infested by a many-headed serpent, dragon, or other monster, which would destroy the whole people if a human victim, generally a virgin, were not delivered up to him periodically. Many victims had perished, and at last it has fallen to the lot of the king’s own daughter to be sacrificed. She is exposed to the monster, but the hero of the tale, generally a young man of humble birth, interposes on her behalf, slays the monster, and receives the hand of the princess as his reward. In many tales of the monster, who is sometimes described as a serpent, inhabits the water of a sea, a lake, or a fountain. In other versions he is a serpent or dragon who takes possession of the springs of water, and only allows the water to flow or the people to make use of it on condition of receiving a human victim. [The Golden Bough, I.135]

The battle of St. George and Baton Rouge
Jeremy Alford on the battle lines being drawn over creating a new city from unincorporated Baton Rouge

320px-Flag_of_England.svgSt George’s Cross

For the English national flag, see Flag of England.
For the Glasgow subway station, see St George’s Cross subway station.
Not to be confused with the Cross of St. George, a military distinction in Russia, or the George Cross, a UK and Commonwealth medal.

The St. George’s cross, seen here on the flag of England.

St George’s Cross (or the Cross of St George) is a red cross on a white background. Originally ensign of theRepublic of Genoa, successively used by crusaders and adopted by England, it became associated with Saint George, the “warrior saint” often depicted as a crusader, from the late Middle Ages.

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